The art of salary negotiation

27 August, 2019
By Dharshini in Human Resource

The Art of Salary Negotiation

Suppose you sailed through an interview and finally landed on that dream job which you have always wanted. But as the HR runs through with you your compensation package, you realise that the starting salary figure is not what you had in mind. Or worse, it is significantly lower than what you had expected. What should you do then?


Undoubtedly, most of us would have been caught in a situation as such. While it is only natural to want to negotiate for a better starting pay, we are also aware of the risks associated with questioning the potential employer on the lower than expected salary - a negative first impression, a seemingly calculative new hire or worse, revoking of the job offer. As such, we tend to feel compelled to accept the job offer. After all, a job - albeit one with a lower starting pay - is better than no job right?

Wrong. In fact, as a job applicant, you can and definitely should negotiate for a better starting salary. Here are some ways to negotiate for a better starting pay smartly and without burning the bridges with your potential employer.

Do your due research

Even before you go for the interview at the prospective company, you should have already done your due research on the company and job that you are applying for. Have a clear understanding of the roles and responsibilities that the role involves as well as the appropriate market compensation package. There are plenty of online recruitment websites that publish pay ranges for certain jobs. While you might not be able to determine the exact market compensation package for a particular job, the pay ranges should provide you with a good gauge of how much other companies are compensating their employees for a similar role.

research

Ponder over the offer

Being offered the (dream) job can be exciting, particularly if you have been job hunting for some time. However, that does not necessarily mean that you have to accept any job offers that come along straightaway. Regardless of how generous the job offer might seem, request for time to consider it properly. Weigh in the pros and cons of accepting the job, including salary, benefits, culture, workload and career advancement, before considering whether a counter offer or salary negotiation is required. Most people tend to worry that asking for additional time to ponder over the job offer might result in the company withdrawing the job offer. However, that is rarely the case.

Show off a little

To get the salary that you desire, you will need to convince your prospective employer why you deserve it. When making your counter offer, list down your accomplishments and experience to make a strong case as to why you deserve a higher pay than the offer on paper. Demonstrate clearly how your experiences and skills can bring value to the company.

Look beyond dollars

Salary negotiation include more than the dollars and cents. Do remember to address other components of the compensation package - higher paid vacation leave, flexible hours, medical coverage of dependents or bonuses. Instead of merely asking of the sake of asking, justify to your prospective employer why you need this additional benefit. Could it be that you have to pick up your five-year-old daughter from daycare at 5:00pm every alternate days? Emphasize to your prospective employers at the very start that these are benefits which are important to you. Even if the answer is no, your prospective manager may eventually be open to granting you that flexible work schedule if you make a strong case about your situation.

Get everything on paper

Once you have reached an agreement with the HR and your prospective employer, be sure to get everything on the contract before you sign it. This is to avoid any nasty surprises once you start your new job.

The Importance of Culture Fit in a Startup Hiring

21 August, 2019
By G-Team in Human Resource

With the slew of Millennials in the workplace today coupled with the thriving startup scene, startup companies exudes the impression of a dynamic workplace - an environment with endless opportunities for employees to grow and learn, chances for employees to contribute innovative ideas that might fuel the company's growth and the possibility of reaping huge rewards should the company eventually succeeds and grow.

However, it is the dynamic and high-staked startup environment that makes it crucial to emphasize on the workplace culture during the startup hiring process. With only a handful of staff within a startup, the impact of a strong fit or a mismatch is highly magnified. An employee that can assimilate well into the startup culture can help to boost morale, increase productivity levels and encourage more innovative and creative ideas. On the other hand, an employee that is unable to fit into the startup culture might result in a disengaged workforce or worse, bring down the entire startup venture.

Read Article 

The importance of culture fit in a startup hiring

20 August, 2019
By Dharshini in Human Resource

The Importance of Culture Fit In A Startup Hiring

With the slew of Millennials in the workplace today coupled with the thriving startup scene, startup companies exudes the impression of a dynamic workplace - an environment with endless opportunities for employees to grow and learn, chances for employees to contribute innovative ideas that might fuel the company's growth and the possibility of reaping huge rewards should the company eventually succeeds and grow.

However, it is the dynamic and high-staked startup environment that makes it crucial to emphasize on the workplace culture during the startup hiring process. With only a handful of staff within a startup, the impact of a strong fit or a mismatch is highly magnified. An employee that can assimilate well into the startup culture can help to boost morale, increase productivity levels and encourage more innovative and creative ideas. On the other hand, an employee that is unable to fit into the startup culture might result in a disengaged workforce or worse, bring down the entire startup venture.


Challenges of building a strong startup culture

While some job seekers might be motivated by the higher risk and uncertainty associated with a startup, it can also contribute to a stressful environment. This might eventually result in tensions running high, disagreements amongst employees and clashes over personality.

Understandably, in the early days of a startup, the primary focus is on profitability and sustainability. This then results in little time for workplace culture development. Without a clear direction on the workplace values and culture, a startup might risk running into a company with no clear culture or even developing a toxic workplace culture moving forward.

It is therefore imperative for startups to identify a clear workplace culture from the start and communicate them clearly and regularly in order to instill and reinforce the workplace culture in employees.

Here are some suggestions to prioritise the startup culture during the hiring process.

Define and market the company's mission and core values.

It will be difficult to manage your startup culture with a clear understanding of the culture you want to achieve within your startup environment and the message that you want your startup to embody. Ensure that your startup mission and core values are expressed clearly on career site or job listings, so that job seekers are able to determine whether your company's mission and values are aligned with their own goals and values.

Incorporate words that reflect your company culture into your job titles and descriptions.

Ensure that your job descriptions and content reflect your startup's goals and values. Write job titles that reflect the diverse responsibilities of the roles within your startup. Include in your job descriptions how your startup intends to incorporate the company values into the role's daily roles and responsibilities

Brand your startup values and culture.

 Get creative! Feature photos and videos of your startup's activities - be it a simply pantry lunch get-together or team bonding activities on your startup website or social media page. This can help to provide job seekers a better understanding of the startup culture.

Weird job titles that make even the most boring jobs sound thrilling

13 August, 2019
By Dharshini in Human Resource

Weird Job Titles That Make Even The Most Boring Jobs Sound Thrilling

The first thing that all job candidates that look out for are the job titles. Likewise, in the working world, job titles can either make or break an employee - providing that first impression to peers, clients and customers outside the organisation.

Gone are the days whereby job titles such as "Manager" or "Vice President" appear on recruitment advertisements. These days, unique and perhaps weird, job titles the likes of ninjas, gurus and wizards, have been popping up on job listings websites as a moniker for jobs that might otherwise sound rather unappealing. While tech giants - the likes of Google and Facebook - provide a library of exotic job titles, smaller companies are also starting to catch on this trend.


As fancy and otherworldly as these job titles may sound, it might over-inflate the roles and responsibilities of the actual job description. This may create confusion amongst potential job applicants. Furthermore, it might in fact limit the talent pool further. After all, how often would a job seeker search for “wizard” in job listings?

However, that does not mean complete abstinence from these exotic job titles. In certain situations, fancy job titles as such may help to elevate certain administrative or mundane jobs, making it sound less boring than it actually is. Here are some suggestions to rebrand certain job titles, so much so that it makes even the most boring job sound thrilling.

Rockstar

The term rock stars might bring up images of star-studded celebrities in Hollywood.

rockstar

However, a "rockstar" job title might also give off the impression that a particular job is unique and exceptional. Take for instance Singapore-based ecommerce platform startup, Shopee, which rebranded an ordinarily mundane marketing internship into a Marketing Rockstar Internship. The job description looks very much the same as that of a marketing intern but the title itself makes their marketing internship sounds more exciting that what one would expect from a typical internship.

Genius

Being called a genius might suggest that a particular someone has exceptionally high IQ or perhaps highly skilled in a particular topic or interest. This could also be applied in the same context when a job title has the word "Genius" in it. At Apple Inc for example. there are actual job titles such as SG-Genius, whereby these Geniuses are stationed at Apple store and attend to customers' queries and troubleshoot technical issues on the customer's Apple products. For such roles, their job titles are more commonly known as IT Technical Support Officer or Customer Care Officer, but with the title of a Genius, this definitely gives off the impression that these Apple Geniuses certainly have the capabilities to resolve almost any technical issue.

Guru

Guru is a Sanskrit term that means "teacher", or used to describe someone with great knowledge and wisdom. The trend of "guru" job listing is relatively common in Singapore, with job titles such as Social Events Guru and Partnerships and Marketing Communications Guru appearing on job listings.

While fancy job titles might sound fun and give off the indication of a laid-back culture within the company, it might also confuse potential job candidates. Most job seekers would search for positions that match their skills and interest - therefore terms such as "guru" and "rockstar" in job titles might confuse job seekers. At times, it might even put them off from applying the job. Instead, it might be best to stick to concise and common job titles - perhaps leaving the fancy job titles to the internal workplace instead.